1,500 year old Ara Gaya kitchen found

연합뉴스 / 2021-06-10 09:41:26
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▲ This photo provided by the Gaya National Research Institute of Cultural Heritage shows photographs of the kitchen site (top) and a diagram from the Ara Gaya royal palace site in Haman. (PHOTO NOT FOR SALE) (Yonhap)

▲ This photo provided by the Gaya National Research Institute of Cultural Heritage shows the excavation of the presumed Ara Gaya royal palace site in Haman. (PHOTO NOT FOR SALE) (Yonhap)

▲ This photo provided by the Gaya National Research Institute of Cultural Heritage shows the cylindrical bowl stand from the Ara Gaya's royal palace site in Haman. (PHOTO NOT FOR SALE) (Yonhap)

▲ This photo provided by the Gaya National Research Institute of Cultural Heritage shows the panoramic view of the presumptive Ara Gaya's royal palace site in Haman. (PHOTO NOT FOR SALE) (Yonhap)

 

 

SEOUL, June 10 (Yonhap) -- Archaeologists have found traces of a cooking-only building from the 6th century AD during the Ara Gaya period, equipped with a fireplace, floor tunnels and chimney facilities, which is believed to be the site of Ara Gaya's royal palace located in Haman-gun, Gyeongsangnam-do.

 

Since 2018, the Gaya National Research Institute of Cultural Heritage has been excavating the royal palace site and announced on Thursday that it has discovered traces of a kitchen after cutting down rocks. 

 

The discovered kitchen site was 11m long, 5m wide, and 80cm deep while the inner wall of the kitchen is 8m long, 3.5m wide, and 15cm high. Within the kitchen, a furnace, floor tunnel called gudeul, and a chimney were lined up inside.

 

The institute added that there is a high possibility that the outer walls are separately equipped in regular intervals as wooden column holes around the building site.

 

According to a survey, the inside floor of the building site was mowed 1~2cm thick and heated to make it firm.

 

An official from the institute said, "The exact size and shape of the furnace cannot be determined as we have only found the lower end of the furnace."  

 

The 'gudeul' is built with flat stones at a maximum length of about 1m and a height of about 50cm, and gray clay is applied outside in order to prevent smoke from leaking out. However, the exact structure was not confirmed because there are no remains of the upper part of the 'gudeul.'

 

Near the chimney, a stone with a circular hole has been found, which researchers are guessing it to have been used as a storage space for water.  

 

The relics include a cylindrical pottery stand, which is believed to be a relic of the Gaya Dynasty in the 6th century, and a reddish-brown cooking earthenware.

 

The typical characteristics of Gaya pottery, such as the wave-patterned decorations and round holes, were observed in the cylindrical stand. In addition, curved jade and bird-shaped holes, known as Ara Gaya earthenware properties, dotted decorations characterized by soya earthenware, and a pair of square holes were also identified.

 

Ara Gaya, also known as Ana Gaya, was a kingdom situated around what is now the town of Haman in South Korea's South Gyeongsang Province, from 42 B.C. to A.D. 559.

 

 

(END)

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